Avoid Swimming Pool Electrocution with Annual Inspections

 
Avoid Swimming Pool Electrocution with Annual Inspections

Swimming pool electrocutions are few and far between, but the fact is that they can happen. Back in 2003, the Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 60 deaths and 50 injuries from swimming pool shock since 1990. Here at Pool Max, we make pool safety a top priority for all of our clients. Read on to learn more about how you can avoid swimming pool electrocution and enjoy a life of shock-free fun in your pool.

Causes of Pool Electrocutions

Some of the most common causes of swimming pool shocks include:
•    Bad wiring for pool equipment or nearby lighting
•    Old pool equipment that is starting to short out
•    Poorly installed pool equipment
•    Damaged wiring from animals, like raccoons and squirrels
•    Minimal to no pool maintenance for an extended period of time

If your pool falls into any of these categories or you just want to be on the safe side, follow the tips below to cut down your risk of electrocution.

Get An Annual Pool Inspection

Getting an annual pool inspection is one of the easiest ways to prevent swimming pool electrocution. Your inspector will test all of your filtration and other equipment to determine if it is working properly. If something is beginning to malfunction, the inspector will tell you what you might pay to have the problem fixed. The sooner you make the repairs, the less likely you will get electrocuted from faulty equipment.

Upgrade Your Equipment

Modern pool equipment is made to reduce the probability of electrocution. The electrical components are sealed so that it is next to impossible for water to get to live wires. If your pool is old or you buy a home with a pool already in it, upgrade the equipment to reduce your chances of electric shock.

Ground Your Pool's Electricity

Most states now require swimming pools to be installed with ground fault interrupters (GFIs) A GFI will trip the electricity running to a swimming pool if it goes over a certain amperage. In other words, it will stop the electricity from causing a lethal shock in the water. If your pool is not currently grounded, it would be wise to invest in this small adjustment. Assuming you already have a GFI on your pool, you should have it tested once every few months to make sure it is still working properly. This simple inspection could be the difference between electrocution and entertainment.